Home > Case Studies > Magnet Therapy Relieved My Period Pains: Case Study

Magnet Therapy Relieved My Period Pains: Case Study

By: Sarah Knowles BA, MA - Updated: 1 Aug 2010 | comments*Discuss
 
Magnet Therapy Period Pains Polycystic

At just 17, Nicola Barnett was routinely suffering such severe period pains that she had to take several days off from school every month, at least.

“I've had chronic period pains since I was 13. They just usually happened about three days before my period, and they were really bad,” says Nicola, who's from Radlett in Hertfordshire.

“I had to go home from school about three times in a week when I had my period, and I was crying as I was in so much pain. All of my friends went through bad periods as well so it wasn't embarrassing, but it was horrible," she recalls. "On the weekend I couldn't even go out I was in so much pain.”

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Nicola had been diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome, which results in irregular periods and cysts in the ovaries, and can also affect a woman's ability to have children. She was prescribed the contraceptive pill to help regulate her periods, but decided not to take it.

“I had the option of going on The Pill but I didn't want to because of the side effects. In general it can make you put on weight and feel bloated, and I didn't want to risk that,” she says.

“So when a family friend who used magnet therapy for migraines and said it really worked for lots of things, I decided to try it. I didn't really believe in it but I had nothing to lose.”

Magnet Therapy for Pain

Magnet therapy is a safe, non-invasive form of alternative medicine that relies on magnets to improve health. People who practice it believe that certain parts of the body will react to magnetostatic fields, and that as a result they witness generalised pain relief in the joints, muscles and other parts of the body.

While many people are sceptical about whether or not magnetic therapy really can be proved scientifically, there is no denying that this alternative medicine works for some people – although this could be just a placebo effect.

Nicola was given a magnetic bracelet that had small almost unnoticeable magnets on it, and began to wear it two weeks before her menstrual cycle was due to commence. “There was a noticeable difference in the amount of pain I felt,” she says.

“I used to take 12 Nurofen a day when I had my period as I was in so much pain. I took three tablets whenever I could. Now I only have to take two at a time and not all the time, maybe only during one day throughout my whole period.”

Bracelet for Life

Nicola says she wears the bracelet all the time now, even when she sleeps.

“It is so simple. I just leave it on,” she says. “It looks like a plain silver chain – I think it's made out of stainless steel. It's not like something that annoys you on your wrists, it doesn't affect me at all.

“To be honest, I don't really know how it works, I just tried it and it surprisingly does work, so I'm happy.

“All my friends know about it, they remember how much pain I was in. One of my friends also had bad period pains and she has started using a magnetic bracelet as well and it works for her too. I think she had worse pain than I did.

“I also know other people use it for other things. My mother uses it for headaches and it helps her. And our best family friend uses it for back pain, he had the worst muscular pain in his back and it's gone now.”

For more information, visit www.magna-health.com.

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